The Importance Of Being Idle

Vang Vieng Rice Paddy, Laos

“It is important from time to time to slow down, to go away by yourself, and simply be.”
 – Eileen Caddy

I’ve become so infuriated by organised group activities and general ‘tourism’ that today I decided to break away from the gang. We arrived into Vang Vieng in the monsoon rains last night, so this morning I indulged in a lie in, which was absolutely glorious. Eventually emerging at around eleven, I donned my hiking boots for the first time since leaving home and strode out in a general ‘countryside’ direction.

Vang Vieng, being essentially a backpacker haven, is mostly known for tubing and kayaking tours. I don’t find either option remotely appealing, largely due to the fact that I’ve done both a number of times with far more freedom and with far fewer crowds. One particularly fond memory is of heading out across the French vineyards near Carcassonne, one summer, fully equipped with all of the inflatables from the pool. We floated down the river on assorted lilos and rubber rings, occasionally getting caught on the odd bit of shallow water, having a hilariously good time. In comparison, heading out with three tour guides, full instructions, routes mapped, proper equipment etc seems somewhat less spontaneous.

Exploring the local area, however, was incredibly rewarding. The general landscape out of town is absolutely breath-taking. Limestone ‘karsts’ are dotted about the place, very much like Ha Long Bay but with vividly green rice paddies replacing the ocean. You can wander out on the magical little paths through the paddies, with precarious bamboo bridges and rivers that you have to jump across (almost inevitably resulting in mud splattering all the way up your legs). Mesmerising arrays of butterflies and dragonflies are chasing and courting each other all around you and the soothing noise of the running water pouring out of bamboo structures creates the epitome of tranquillity.

Vang Vieng Rice Paddy, Laos

One of the more lacklustre of the bunch...

One of the more lacklustre of the bunch…

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Vang Vieng, Laos

After ambling down a dirt road for a while I decided to follow a very poorly translated signpost which pointed towards a cave “where you bath”. This took me down a tiny little path winding through banana plantations and lush wilderness which was actually a little disconcerting as there wasn’t a soul in sight and the tight turns resulted in very poor visibility. What’s more, the screeches of the crickets were quite alarming; they were exactly like that horrible sound you make when you scrape cutlery across an empty plate. Round one tight corner I spotted an incredibly bizarre snake – around a metre and a half long but so thin that it can’t have been more than a centimetre or two wide. It reared up, with some little creature in its mouth that was screaming its heart out, and darted quickly into the jungle. I’m not sure what it was exactly, but having looked online the closest I’ve come is a ‘painted bronzeback’. By this stage, my stomach was obstinately reminding me that it was lunchtime, so I decided to give up on the rather unnerving trail and head back to the open space!

A small herd of cattle, blocking the route back to the road - thankfully they were very docile!

A small herd of cattle, blocking the route back to the road – thankfully they were very docile!

Calf seeking shelter from the heat.

Calf seeking shelter from the heat.

Vang Vieng , Laos

Rambling about the place was such a fantastic opportunity to get a sneak peek into the genuine lives of the locals: families gathered in the dark of their bamboo huts around a pot of steamed rice, farmers tending the cattle and paddies, little kids splashing about in the mud whilst the fishermen work their traditional nets in the rivers, young boys proudly sporting their smart uniforms as they cycled to and from school. One boy, perched up on a tiny little branch at the top of a tree, like a sparrow, shouting out ‘sa bai dee’ (hello), jumped down and ran over to me to offer his half eaten guava, which was rather adorable. Such a shame that I was unable to communicate in any way – hello and thank-you are the extent of my Laos linguistic abilities, unsurprisingly!

Bridge across the fast-moving river.

Bridge across the fast-moving river.

Vang Vieng River

Laos fisherman

Vang Vieng road

 

Boy in tree Vang Vieng

I’m getting to grips with the local street food increasingly as time passes – the basic concept initially was just entirely foreign to me and nobody explained it, so it’s taken a while! You get the basic ‘canvas’ of the meal given to you, most often rice noodle soup, and then you’re able to choose all the flavours and seasoning yourself from the things available to you on the table – what I initially mistook for a salad is pot of fresh herbs: here it’s mint and a strange lemony tasting leaf that looks a little like basil. Then there are sauces – in this case an additional delicious thick peanut/chilli sauce, chillis, garlic, curry powder etc

The basic 'noodle soup' has morphed into varying forms in the different countries.  Here in Vang Vieng it came with a sort of dark gelatinous tofu, a side of fresh bean sprouts and topped with fried garlic.

The basic ‘noodle soup’ has morphed into varying forms in the different countries. Here in Vang Vieng it came with a sort of dark gelatinous tofu, a side of fresh bean sprouts and topped with fried garlic.

Rice Paddies, Vang Vieng, Laos

 

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Octopus’s Garden

Nha Trang Coral Reef

“The ocean is a mighty harmonist.”
 – William Wordsworth

Despite being warned that the snorkelling here at Nha Trang wasn’t that great I decided to head out on a motorboat to check it out for myself.

I love the coral formation's resemblance to roses when the colour's removed.

Aquatic ‘rose garden’.

Nha Trang Coral Bed

Yes, ok – it’s no Maldives but you can still find incredibly beautiful arrays of vividly coloured coral beds. All the usual suspects are flashing about for you to admire: Parrot, trigger, butterfly and clown fish etc (despite their irritating talent for dodging the camera). There were also a variety of stunning live cowries – relishing, no doubt, the absence of any avid shell collectors.

Nha Trang Coral

Nha Trang blue starfish

Cornetfish

I enjoyed the presence of the slightly more unusual cornet and trumpet fish – two of the more ridiculous looking creatures on the planet –  with hilariously elongated ‘noses’ . I also love the way the Moorish idols (what a lot of people, including me, inaccurately call angel-fish) seem to leave little white scribbles behind them in the water as they dart about.

The trip out on the boat also provided the opportunity to find more natural, secluded spots than the bustle of the main beach. One of the stops was a tiny little island, complete with miniature Buddhist shrine. Another interesting sighting were little fishing villages built to entirely float on the water. Built largely out of corrugated iron, they weren’t particularly photogenic, but a novelty nevertheless.

An example of some of the houses precariously built onto the cliffside.

An example of some of the houses precariously built onto the cliffside.

Getting out of the town allowed me to see a more endearing side of the Nha Trang area. It was sorely needed. Particularly after being practically mugged by an old lady demanding money in the street in an incredibly violent way – grabbing my arm in a vice-like pincer grip and trying to pull my bag off my back! Not what you’d expect from an innocent looking ‘grandma’.

This is to satisfy any curiosity as to what the inside of a dragon fruit looks like. The inside's just as unexpected as the out.

This (served up on the boat) is to satisfy any curiosity as to what the inside of a dragon fruit looks like. The inside’s just as unexpected as the out.

The camera doesn't quite capture the incredible neon florescence of this coral. Love how the rock in the middle looks like an artist's used paint pallet though.

The camera doesn’t quite capture the incredible neon florescence of this coral. Love how the rock in the middle looks like an artist’s used paint pallet, though.

 

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