Right Here Waiting

Love the marbling of the algae around this odd couple

Love the marbling of the algae around this odd couple

‘The best-laid schemes o’ mice an’ men/ Gang aft agley’. Today I got a sinking feeling of panic on hearing that my flight was delayed by over two hours due to the weather and I wouldn’t be able to make my connection. Getting a little more familiar with these situations, I established that hotels in Los Angeles are packed out due to the Special Olympics at the moment, so my only real option was to venture back out into Newark, New Jersey. The obliging lady at the check-in desk rearranged to the next viable alternative: unfortunately it’s 11 hours longer than my previous flights and with an extra stop-over but nothing I can do about that, so have had to shake off the annoyance. Right now I’m sat in an inordinately expensive, but simultaneously revolting, hotel relatively near to the airport so I can try again tomorrow. Not a favourable thing to happen when you’re supposed to be travelling on a budget, but a relatively small obstacle in comparison to other potential items from the list of ‘things that could go wrong’ (*touch wood*).

The plus side of this situation is that I’ve had plenty of time to relax after the hot energy of New York.

Touching John Lennon memorial in Strawberry Fields, Central Park

Touching John Lennon memorial in Strawberry Fields, Central Park

Fingers crossed that tomorrow will be easier.

Thanks, Alby

Thanks, Alby

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Bright Lights, Bigger City

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As our time in New York draws to a close, I thought I’d focus on two of the highlights of our trip: Central Park and the museums. I must admit, the attempted ‘renaissance style’ of many of the ‘old’ buildings did amuse me a little – purely because I’ve been spoilt by living in Europe. The architecture of the museums was still pretty impressive (if you don’t try to compare it!).

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, on the side of the park, was enormous! We particularly enjoyed the Monet, Manet and Degas collections but, arguably, the most unique installation was the 10 B.C. Egyptian Temple of Dendur – that’s right the entire temple has been installed into the museum! Up on top there’s a summer drinks bar with beautiful views of the skyline over the park, but be warned: it has very limited seating.

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Temple of Dendur

Special exhibition - China through the looking glass.

Special exhibition – China through the looking glass.

That iconic Seurat

That iconic Seurat

View from the roof

View from the roof

We accidentally snuck into the Museum of natural history round the back as couldn’t find the entrance… it certainly rivals the London equivalent. For us, the Blue Whale representation and dinosaur collection were the best parts!

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Butterfly dispay

Butterfly display

Next onto the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). This is definitely one not to be missed – the Andy Warhol collection was particularly impressive but the whole gallery was impeccable.

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We ran out of time and money for the Guggenheim but at least managed to admire it’s unusual structure as we walked down the east side of the park.

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The park, in general, was draw-dropping – not just because of its immense size but also due to the beautiful variety. We loved the huge rock structures dotted about the place between the trees.

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We loved watching the little turtles poking their noses out from the algae. Spot the two here that have ventured out to enjoy the sun.

We spent ages eagerly watching the little turtles poking their noses out from the algae. Spot the two here that have ventured out to enjoy the sun.

Belvedere 'Castle'

Belvedere ‘Castle’

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We got very excited watching the various baseball games going on throughout the lawns – it always surprises me how different American culture is to English! Speaking of which – only in America would you get a complementary cake with your meal! Brunch here is apparently a huge thing at the weekends so Katherine and I headed to ‘Friends of a Farmer’ in Greenwich Village for omelette and pancakes with free apple corn cake stuff. Having said that, the portions are not as big here as they had been on the west coast – perhaps we’ve just not been going to the right places; in general we’ve found food to be extremely expensive, particularly fruit and veg. I paid $4 for two apples the other day. FOUR dollars.

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Final stop: Empire State building. We went up at night to get a little variety from the ‘Top of the Rock’. The view was suitably incredible but I still maintain that the top of the Rockefeller is better purely because you have the iconic Empire State within the view. It’s just like the Eiffel tower in Paris – you can go up the tower but I think better views of the city can be achieved up the Arc de triumph as the iconic structure dominates the skyline, creating views that truly can’t be mistaken for another large city.

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And that’s all for now folks. Been kicked out of the Airbnb so just perched in Starbucks waiting to head to the airport for my two day flight to the South Pacific now!

For You Blue

Blue Lagoon Malta

‘There is no blue without yellow and without orange’ – Vincent Van Gogh

Malta, for me, was all about the colours. The sandy buildings in the ancient cities contrasted perfectly with the vivid blues of the sea. Spring was the perfect time to visit as the temperature was ideal and the landscape hadn’t yet been stripped of its flora. The transport system was absolutely fantastic. We paid under 2 euros for a whole day’s pass on the local bus network which took us around the island. Definitely not worth shelling out for taxis! Given Malta’s size, there is a surprisingly large amount to see and do! I’ll run through our highlights briefly:

1. Blue Lagoon, Comino – accessed via a ferry from the north of the Island. Pretty busy in the heat of the day though so time your visit carefully to avoid the crowds! Definitely must be done though. Hopefully the pictures speak for themselves but, in case they don’t, it boasted the clearest, bluest water that I have seen in a very long time – perhaps not since the Maldives!

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2. Mdina – a spectacular, ancient fortified city which served as the country’s capital until 1530. We arrived as the light was fading so could experience the city being lit up by lanterns. A fantastically authentic experience.

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The lavish Maltese coffee speciality

The lavish Maltese coffee speciality

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3. The hiking path for the west coast beaches down from Golden Bay.

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Slightly further north up the west coast you bump into ‘Popeye village’ in Anchor bay, the film set for the film which has been perfectly preserved and turned into a tourist attraction. We didn’t go into the village itself as we arrived quite late in the evening, but was great fun just to get a peek!

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4. The ‘three cities’ and the capital, Valetta. Think ‘Game of Thrones’. Very eye-catching and dramatic scenes!

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Thought I'd finish on this rather enthusiastic not-so-medieval carriage driver!

Thought I’d finish on this rather enthusiastic not-so-medieval carriage driver!

City Of Black & White

Museum Island

Museum Island

Bubble blower

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We were a little taken aback, on arriving into Germany for the first time, to find the most inefficient train station I’ve seen in quite a while. No clear signs or indication of which train is on which platform at all! Heading into central Berlin, things didn’t immediately improve as there seemed to be nobody there. Perhaps this due to the fact that at 10/11 in the morning the tourists and party-lovers are either still out or are crashing… anyway, having got up at 3 to catch a cheap early flight a little ‘crash’ was a necessary detour before heading out. Airbnb in Mitte – again very easy and very good value.

First stop – the nearest shop in sight to get warmer clothes inc. hat/gloves which I had ridiculously left behind.

Take two – now layered up like the Michelin man it felt safe to venture out into the city.

Brandenburg Gate

Brandenburg Gate

Reichstag Building - historical edifice built for the Imperial Diet of the German Empire.

Reichstag Building – historical edifice built for the Imperial Diet of the German Empire.

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In the wake of a snowy winter, all the colour seems to have been sapped from the City. This is particularly evident in the striking Holocaust memorial below.

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It does get a little brighter, however, when it comes to the street art. The East Side Gallery in particular is a must-see! (section of the remaining Berlin Wall covered in ‘grafitti’)

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Topography of Terror - on the site of the old Gestop base you can find a fantastic little summary of Nazi Germany in this small museum.

Topography of Terror – on the site of the old Gestop base you can find a fantastic little summary of Nazi Germany in this small museum.

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Berliner Dom (Cathedral)

Berliner Dom (Cathedral)

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Apple Strudel!

Apple Strudel!

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Overall, I apologize in advance for offending anybody, it was not particularly my cup of tea. Very bleak, stark and sombre. Fascinating in terms of historical content – the scars of past wars are clearly visible and it hosts a phenomenal range of museums. You may consider visiting in the summer, however I felt the stories held by the city seemed to strike even harder in the bitter cold, making it a memorable but fairly solemn experience.

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Sugar Town

Nyhavn Copenhagen

“Everything you look at can become a fairy tale and you can get a story from everything you touch.”
― Hans Christian Andersen

It’s always intimidating to arrive at a hostel in the late evening: the large groups of ‘well-oiled’ young adults from all corners of the globe make you feel like you’ve wandered into some exclusive bar by yourself in the middle of the night.

First impressions of Copenhagen: The air coming off the plane from London seemed ridiculously fresh and clean. It appeared pretty small and manageable, with very picturesque canals and cobbled streets scattered with hundreds of bicycles.

Nyhavn Copenhagen

Nyhavn Copenhagen

Nyhavn Copenhagen

I was a little wobbly with the road system at first: I was wondering why the road was so wide before realising that half of it was a ‘bike road’ which sort of disguises itself as a very wide pavement, a misunderstanding which led to a few close shaves. On the first morning I wandered out to Nyhavn, a famous ‘heritage harbour’ canal waterfront packed with brightly coloured 17th/18th Century town houses which now act as cafés and restaurants. From here I meandered to the little mermaid statue, inspired of course by Hans Christian Anderson’s tale of the mermaid who gives up her aquatic life to gain the love of a prince and a human soul (dying tragically in the original tale, unlike the disney-tainted version which most people are now more familiar with). I’d been advised to not expect much, or even to avoid the site altogether due to the absurd number of tourists who flock to see it. As expected, it was absolutely crammed with people of all origins literally clambering all over it. However, having studied Hans Christian Anderson’s tale this year at university I couldn’t help but love it. In fact I think it depends a lot on the timing. I headed back for the evening light later in the day to see a fraction of the crowds that were there before.

The Little Mermaid Copenhagen

The Little Mermaid Copenhagen

The gardens, fountains and churches dotted about the city are beautifully maintained, seeming almost regimented and square. There are also these bizarre lines of bright orange identical buildings dotted about the place which I assume are for housing.

Rosenburg Castle

Rosenburg Castle

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I was incredibly lucky with the weather – absolutely spotless blue skies. I actually made the mistake of sunbathing in the park on the second day and managed to burn my entire body. I tried out one of the ‘soft ice’ ice creams which apparently is a local favourite, although found it far too sweet and creamy – no way near as good as the similar ones from ‘The Eskimo Hut’ in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

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The food and, well, everything really, is incredibly expensive. Far more so than London, Paris or Tokyo even. Just as an indicator a small bottled juice cost the equivalent of around £5. I splurged on some expensive pastries though which, although undoubtedly fantastic, were again a little too sweet for my tastes.

Bakery Copenhagen

To compensate for the expense of the food (which I lowered by bringing food from home in my luggage) I stuck to free city activities, such as checking out the ‘Statens Museum for Kunst’ (national art gallery) and the national museum which had a fascinating exhibition on ancient Nordic history. The art gallery had a great selection of Matisse and Picasso, and some interesting local Danish art but didn’t take overly long to get through, say in comparison to the national gallery here in London.

Matisse self portrait

Matisse self portrait

Sculpture of Hans Christian Anderson's haunting 'Story of the Mother'. Here death is taking away the young child.

Sculpture of Hans Christian Anderson’s haunting ‘Story of the Mother’. Here death is taking away the young child.

Botanical gardens

Botanical gardens

Strøget - the centre of the shopping district.

Strøget – the centre of the shopping district.

The only site I expended a few Kroner for was the ’round tower’, with a bizarre curving brick walk way leading up to a beautiful view over the city.

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(Nothing But) Flowers

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“The earth laughs in flowers.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

This morning we headed back out through the Osaka subway system and the Japanese Rail bullet train to Kyoto where we wandered about the temples and parks of the South Eastern part of the city. Due to the Sakuri (blossom) the festival of Hanami (flower viewing) was in full swing in the city, with women getting out their traditional kimonos and fairs popping up in all the parks.

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We headed to a little traditional tea parlour called ‘En’ were we watched a 45 minute tea ceremony. I couldn’t help thinking about Karl Pilkington banging on about how someone can make such a big deal out of a cup of tea. This kept me chuckeling whilst the lady careful folded and refolded her napkin numerous times to ceremoniously wipe and present each utensil before carefully preparing the matcha green tea with, frothing it up with a bamboo whisk. The matcha green tea is ground up young tea leaves which have been carefully grown to reduce the amount of sunlight they get to keep the taste sweet. It has a surprisingly large amount of caffeine in it as it’s not just the leaf being infused in the water, you’re actually drinking the leave itself.

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Kneeled on the floor, we then drank and enjoyed little Japanese sweets, of which they are completely obsessed here, with sweet shops every 5 metres. Then, with the sun starting to set we headed out to Maruyama park.

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It’s been bitingly cold so I’m actually really looking forward to getting back to the company of 30 odd naked women at the Onsen.

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Outro

Lotus Flowers

“Summer ends, and Autumn comes, and he who would have it otherwise would have high tide always and a full moon every night.”
 – Hal Borland

The time has finally come for my summer to draw to a close. Bangkok has whizzed past in a blur of alcohol and cheap massages.

I’m not viewing my homecoming as the end, per say, more like a new start in a different place. To be perfectly honest I’d been looking forward to escaping the omnipotent smell of fish sauce.

Khao San Road - great spot for a big of haggling over typical backpacker goodies: baggy clothes, jewellery, pirated dvds etc etc

Khao San Road – great spot for a big of haggling over typical backpacker goodies: baggy clothes, jewellery, pirated dvds etc etc

Don't be alarmed - it's not me. Sandra, my mexican room mate, decided on a slightly clichéed visit to one of the multiple Bangkok tattoo parlours.

Don’t be alarmed – it’s not me. Sandra, my Mexican room mate, decided on a, slightly clichéd, visit to one of the multiple Bangkok tattoo parlours.

 

As has come to be a habit when visiting new cities, I took a trip to the National Art Gallery. It was in pretty bad condition; It appeared of going through some sort of construction work, with most of the building empty. However there was an inspiring little exhibition in an odd set-up outside of the main building. I was rather taken with a duo of intricate and lively collages by a man called Sittichoke Wichian entitled ‘Living Ways, Bonds and Happiness’. Here’s one of the two:
Bangkok National art gallery

Below is another piece which caught my eye as it reflected the craftsmanship that’s typical throughout South East Asia – silk weaving. It depicts a series of poses of a shrouded nun, through gaps in the indigo silk work.

Bangkok national art gallery

I’ve also tried to make the most of the fantastic street food in the last few days. My staple diet of curry, pad thai, Mango sticky rice and tofu stir fry extended into breakfast. Here’s my eight a.m tofu green curry!

I have to admit though, birds eye chillies in a green curry first thing in the morning are not so easy on the stomach.

I have to admit though, birds eye chillies in a green curry first thing in the morning are not so easy on the stomach.

I’m still not entirely won over by Bangkok, being a little put off by the overly aggressive approach of some of the vendors and the slight sketchy feeling you get from certain places at night time. However, I can’t deny that it’s a fun place to visit. It’s particularly great at the end of a trip as you can stock up on souvenir’s and $10 full body massages before heading back to reality. In my case, the return was a lavish three day journey, the highlight being the night spent on the stone floor of Mumbai airport.

Needless to say, it’s good to be home. It was a bit of a shock to the system to descend into the freezing grey ‘mizzle’ but as Steinbeck wisely puts it in his ‘Travels with Charley‘ “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness.” I’m heading out on a whole new adventure in a few short days as I move up to London to finally re-start university. This is by no means the end – more like a respite from excessing moving about the place  – with any luck there will be many more summers to come so WATCH THIS SPACE!

I really want to thank-you all for being such a huge support to me throughout this adventure – I really do appreciate it more than I can say. I’ll leave you with a quote from the brilliant Albert Camus as I attempt to descend once again into the charted waters of the bitter cold. Let’s hope the unpleasant days of the 2011 winter, the last one that I was around to experience, are behind me.

“In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.”

~Albert Camus

Khao San Road by day

White Shadows

White Hibiscus

“I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”
― Robert Louis Stevenson, Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes

My ability to sympathise with this attitude is currently limited. The actual act of travelling from one place to the next is the evil you have to suffer in order to arrive at your destinations. Well that’s how I’m feeling at this current moment in time, anyway: The last three days have been occupied entirely by such ‘movement’. In fact, I think it’s been the longest total amount of time I’ve ever spent in assorted methods of transport over such a short space of time.

The first two days were occupied entirely by 10+ hours a day on an aptly named slow-boat up the Mekong river from the fantastic Luang Prabang. A lack of A/C and comfortable seats was not entirely welcome. The conditions were exacerbated by the motor breaking down and a conversion to a rickety tuk-tuk. This was an experience not unlike sitting on a bucking bronco whilst simultaneously showering in the reverse setting of a hoover. The sweaty, wooden snail-boat suddenly seemed like five star luxury.  A brief night was spent in the unimposing border town of Xuang Hai, followed by a further day’s journey into Thailand in a, far preferable, minibus.

Yes, the views were pretty stunning, but there's a limit to how much you can appreciate them after 20 hours of the same scene.

Yes, the views were pretty stunning, but there’s a limit to how much you can appreciate them after 20 hours of the same scene.

Sunset from the back of a Laotian tuk-tuk.

Sunset from the back of a Laotian tuk-tuk.

Today’s journey was a substantial improvement as we were able to stop off at sights en route to our final destination of Chiang Mai.

The 'Golden Triangle'. From this point in Thailand you can see the border into Myanmar on the left of the river and into Laos on the right. Historically infamous for use in the opium trade.

The ‘Golden Triangle’. From this point in Thailand you can see the border into Myanmar on the left of the river and into Laos on the right. Historically infamous for use in the opium trade.

The Golden Buddha, shining out as a welcoming beacon to the two other immediately adjacent countries.

The Golden Buddha, shining out as a welcoming beacon to the two other immediately adjacent countries.

The second and most impressive of our slight detours was ‘Wat Rong Khun’ in Chiang Rai, more commonly known to foreigners as the ‘White Temple’. Designed by Chalermchai Kositpipat, the temple is unique in that it’s entirely (you guessed it) white, with mirrored glass mosaics over the structure emphasising this brilliance, which alludes to the purity of the Lord Buddha. It’s very contemporary, being built only in 1997. I’m surprised that it’s not received with more controversy due to the quite shocking nature of some of the sculpture: skulls and skeleton forms woven into the mesh of walls and an area, near the entrance, of arms reaching from the ground – perhaps representing tormented souls in purgatory.

Inside the temple is a wax-work monk that took me a good half hour to dismiss as not being a real person. There’s also a bizarre collection of modern day heroes and film characters painted onto the walls. Very strange indeed.

White temple Chiang Rai

White temple Chiang Rai

White temple Chiang Rai

White temple Chiang Rai

Surrounding the 'White temple' are, as usual, other smaller Wats and shrines. Here's a the rather beautiful base of a wishing well. Don't be fooled by the clarity, this is actually underwater.

Surrounding the ‘White temple’ are, as usual, other smaller Wats and shrines. Here’s a the rather beautiful base of a wishing well. Don’t be fooled by the clarity, this is actually underwater.

White temple Chang Rai

White temple Chang Rai

White temple Chang Rai

As ever, it’s impossible to recount the entirety of the past few days (my posts are already increasing in length by the day) So I’ll skip over the cashew nut factory and my miserable new head-cold and will leave Chiang Mai for next time.

Having said that, who knew that cashew nuts grew on trees underneath cashew ‘apples’?!

Cashew nuts

 

Going On

Frangipani flower, Laos

Dok Champa a.k.a. the frangipani – national flower of Laos & symbol of joy and sincerity.

“We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”
 – Walt Disney

Yesterday we bade farewell to Vietnam and set off on a short flight South West to Vientiane – Capital of Laos. The difference between the two countries is not immediately distinguishable, expect perhaps that the number of motorbikes on the streets has suddenly decreased dramatically! Another slight difference is that the prices are marginally higher here, probably due to the fact that the country’s land-locked. The French influence is still prominent; Vientiane even has it’s own ‘arc de triomphe’!

Vientiane's 'arc de triomphe'

We headed out to the ‘Buddha Park’ this morning: a sculpture park crammed full of 200 Buddhist and Hindu statues. Although the park was only started in 1958 the statues create the illusion of being centuries old, giving the park a mysterious and almost chilling atmosphere!

Buddha Park, Vientiane

Buddha Park, Vientiane

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Buddha Park, Vientiane

Buddha Park, Vientiane

One particularly unusual sculpture, in the form of a giant pumpkin, allows you to go inside into a kind of labyrinth with three levels representing hell, earth and heaven. You enter through the mouth of a three metre tall demon head and climb up from hell to heaven, with smaller sculptures inside the maze on each level.

Buddha Park, Vientiane

The view from 'heaven'.

The view from ‘heaven’.

Vientiane also brings back memories of Yangon due to the ‘Stupas’ throughout the city which strongly resemble the Myanmar Pagodas. Pha That Luang Stupa is generally viewed as the most important national monument in Laos.

Temple at Pha That Luang Stupa.

Temple at Pha That Luang Stupa.

I've always had a soft spot for interesting translations!

I’ve got a bit of a soft spot for poor translations…

 

In terms of food, I haven't notice too much of a difference from Vietnam yet, rice and noodles obviously being the staples throughout Indochina. One thing that is apparent here that was absent beforehand is sticky rice. Here are some bizarre sticky rice 'lollypops' dipped in egg yolk and cooked on a bbq!

In terms of food, I haven’t notice too much of a difference from Vietnam yet, rice and noodles obviously being the staples throughout Indochina. One thing that is apparent here that was absent beforehand is sticky rice. Here are some bizarre sticky rice ‘lollypops’ dipped in egg yolk and cooked on a bbq!

 

 

Goodnight Saigon

Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, (previously Saigon) is a fantastically vivacious city. One thing you’ve really got to watch out for, however, is the traffic! Over 2 million motorbikes saturate the roads and pedestrian crossings appear to be a completely foreign concept. You basically have to walk out into the stream of bikes and walk steadily across whilst they swerve around you. You’re advised not to stop whilst you’re walking as it can confuse them. This is much harder than it would seem as basic survival instincts would encourage you not to carry on walking into the path of a fast moving vehicle!

The period of French administration has left a firm mark on the city. Beautiful French architecture is dotted about along with an abundance of bakeries!

Here's the inside of the city post office, designed and constructed by Gustav Eiffel. The building remained untouched during the later period of turmoil.

Here’s the inside of the city post office, designed and constructed by Gustav Eiffel. The building remained untouched during the later period of turmoil.

Saigon's very own 'Notre-Dame' cathedral.

Saigon’s very own ‘Notre-Dame’ cathedral.

Of the many interesting activities available, I’d recommend the Art museum; despite being rather poorly exhibited it boasts a really interesting and unique collection of Vietnamese art. It’s also got a note-worthy collection of Vietnamese propaganda posters from the war. After having whetted your appetite you can pop across the road to the buzzing ‘Ben Thanh’ market to have a look at some of the beautiful local artwork and other bits and bobs for sale.

Inside Ho Chi Minh Art Museum

Ben Thanh Market

Here's a lady using variously different naturally coloured egg shells on lacquer to decorate her vases. This technique was prominent in the Art gallery and produces some really striking effects.

Here’s a lady using variously different naturally coloured egg shells on lacquer to decorate her vases. This technique was prominent in the Art gallery and produces some really striking effects.

Egg shell art

Another endearing quality of the city is the food selection. I’m likely to be biased as I have a bit of a thing for Vietnamese food but the fresh spring rolls with nutty hoisin sauce are just to die for.

About an hour out of the city you can find the Cu Chi tunnels – an elaborate and extensive network of underground tunnels used by the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War.

Cu Chi tunnels

These holes are no ‘Bag End’; they epitomised “nasty, dirty” and “wet… filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell”. It’s shocking just how small the tunnels are and how well the entrances can be concealed. Essentially, the analogy generally used is to rats tunnelling under the rice fields to avoid being caught. You pretty much have to be the size of a rat to navigate through them. It seems impossible to imagine how they were used for communication, supply routes, living quarters and shelter, at times for days on end!  Some of the tunnels have now been made wider and taller to accommodate tourists but it’s still an experience to avoid if you’re even remotely claustrophobic!

Cu Chi tunnels

Cu Chi tunnels

Cu Chi also has displays and demonstrations of the methods of the Viet Cong including some fairly gruesome traps and a chance to fire a variety of the different guns (ranging from an AK-47 to the M60 machine gun) in their firing range!

Cu Chi tunnels

Here's a lady making the traditional rice paper for spring rolls etc...

Here’s a lady making the traditional rice paper for spring rolls etc…

It was interesting to see the war from a different perspective – with the Viet Cong as the protagonists – after studying the Americans involvement in school. The man showing us around the site had actually fought with the Viet Cong himself and had bullet wounds in his arms and leg to boot!