White Walls

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“I’d rather live in a cave with a view of a palace than live in a palace with a view of a cave.”
 – Karl Pilkington

Osaka castle was the first stop this morning after revisiting a favourite Japanese bakery. It’s incredible just how many people have come over to see the country in this season, and you can see why – it’s extraordinary. Around the castle there where huge groups of tours from various Asian countries, including a football team from Myanmar who I spoke to about Yangon for a while. Wedding’s are going on everywhere and all the women are getting our their best clothes for the season.

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After yet another tube/JR train journey we arrived back in Kyoto and headed to the North West to explore the temples in the hillside forest side of the city before heading back across to Nijo castle in the west. We must have walked miles today my feet are absolutely killing me! Definitely worth it though. Apologies for being lazy but I’m going to let the pictures speak for themselves again.

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N.B. – Very exciting spotting the Geisha’s wandering around the Gion district of the city. Didn’t manage to get a shot though as wasn’t sure whether it was appropriate. Also enjoying the avian spotting opportunities – saw a peregrine falcon (Hayabusa, as they’re known in Japan) today!

 

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(Nothing But) Flowers

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“The earth laughs in flowers.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

This morning we headed back out through the Osaka subway system and the Japanese Rail bullet train to Kyoto where we wandered about the temples and parks of the South Eastern part of the city. Due to the Sakuri (blossom) the festival of Hanami (flower viewing) was in full swing in the city, with women getting out their traditional kimonos and fairs popping up in all the parks.

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We headed to a little traditional tea parlour called ‘En’ were we watched a 45 minute tea ceremony. I couldn’t help thinking about Karl Pilkington banging on about how someone can make such a big deal out of a cup of tea. This kept me chuckeling whilst the lady careful folded and refolded her napkin numerous times to ceremoniously wipe and present each utensil before carefully preparing the matcha green tea with, frothing it up with a bamboo whisk. The matcha green tea is ground up young tea leaves which have been carefully grown to reduce the amount of sunlight they get to keep the taste sweet. It has a surprisingly large amount of caffeine in it as it’s not just the leaf being infused in the water, you’re actually drinking the leave itself.

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Kneeled on the floor, we then drank and enjoyed little Japanese sweets, of which they are completely obsessed here, with sweet shops every 5 metres. Then, with the sun starting to set we headed out to Maruyama park.

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It’s been bitingly cold so I’m actually really looking forward to getting back to the company of 30 odd naked women at the Onsen.

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Knives Out

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Now settled into Osaka, we took a 30 minutes train journey into Kyoto for a four hour class on samurai sword practice with SEIGA, Samurai Kembu. They take it incredibly seriously as it’s a highly regarded part of their tradition, now only used as a performance art rather than the ancient warriors using the practice in battle. It was impossible not to be constantly thinking of Uma Thurman in her yellow tracksuit throughout the entire process.

There were just three of us in the class with one ‘Samurai Grand Master’: Auga Ryu. We were taught various routines about how to correctly draw, wield and formally present the spectacular weapon. We were even elaborately dressed in tradition Samurai attire to fully experience the restrictions which the clothing brings into the action. For example for me it made it much easier to understand why the women traditionally would take such tiny little steps as the very wide obi belt is wrapped restrictively tight like a corset around your waist and hips.

Kyoto itself is a beautifully traditional city with plenty of old Japanese architecture and copious temples and shrines. Black kites seems to be pretty common here, soaring around above the rivers. As it’s cherry blossom season there are also numerous festivals going on throughout the city with processions, parades and dance competitions around every corner.

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Traditional tea preparation

Traditional tea preparation

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Kyoto Imperial Palace

Kyoto Imperial Palace

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Above you can see one of the hilarious ‘pet hire’ opportunities. You can pay for half an hour to use the cafe where you can stay to stroke the cats. You can also hire dogs for walks or, if you’re on a budget, even a beetle. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/7818140.stm

Japanese sweet

Japanese sweet

Lunch in Kyoto. Miso soup, tofu rice dish and japanese pickle.

Lunch in Kyoto. Miso soup, tofu rice dish and japanese pickle.

I’m now about to head off to the ‘Onsen’ or traditional Japanese spa/hot spring again. Hilariously, it’s split genders and absolutely no clothes are allowed, which they’re very strict about. Very bizarre experience but the spa itself is fantastic after the cold of the crisp spring weather.