Goodnight Saigon

Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, (previously Saigon) is a fantastically vivacious city. One thing you’ve really got to watch out for, however, is the traffic! Over 2 million motorbikes saturate the roads and pedestrian crossings appear to be a completely foreign concept. You basically have to walk out into the stream of bikes and walk steadily across whilst they swerve around you. You’re advised not to stop whilst you’re walking as it can confuse them. This is much harder than it would seem as basic survival instincts would encourage you not to carry on walking into the path of a fast moving vehicle!

The period of French administration has left a firm mark on the city. Beautiful French architecture is dotted about along with an abundance of bakeries!

Here's the inside of the city post office, designed and constructed by Gustav Eiffel. The building remained untouched during the later period of turmoil.

Here’s the inside of the city post office, designed and constructed by Gustav Eiffel. The building remained untouched during the later period of turmoil.

Saigon's very own 'Notre-Dame' cathedral.

Saigon’s very own ‘Notre-Dame’ cathedral.

Of the many interesting activities available, I’d recommend the Art museum; despite being rather poorly exhibited it boasts a really interesting and unique collection of Vietnamese art. It’s also got a note-worthy collection of Vietnamese propaganda posters from the war. After having whetted your appetite you can pop across the road to the buzzing ‘Ben Thanh’ market to have a look at some of the beautiful local artwork and other bits and bobs for sale.

Inside Ho Chi Minh Art Museum

Ben Thanh Market

Here's a lady using variously different naturally coloured egg shells on lacquer to decorate her vases. This technique was prominent in the Art gallery and produces some really striking effects.

Here’s a lady using variously different naturally coloured egg shells on lacquer to decorate her vases. This technique was prominent in the Art gallery and produces some really striking effects.

Egg shell art

Another endearing quality of the city is the food selection. I’m likely to be biased as I have a bit of a thing for Vietnamese food but the fresh spring rolls with nutty hoisin sauce are just to die for.

About an hour out of the city you can find the Cu Chi tunnels – an elaborate and extensive network of underground tunnels used by the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War.

Cu Chi tunnels

These holes are no ‘Bag End’; they epitomised “nasty, dirty” and “wet… filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell”. It’s shocking just how small the tunnels are and how well the entrances can be concealed. Essentially, the analogy generally used is to rats tunnelling under the rice fields to avoid being caught. You pretty much have to be the size of a rat to navigate through them. It seems impossible to imagine how they were used for communication, supply routes, living quarters and shelter, at times for days on end!  Some of the tunnels have now been made wider and taller to accommodate tourists but it’s still an experience to avoid if you’re even remotely claustrophobic!

Cu Chi tunnels

Cu Chi tunnels

Cu Chi also has displays and demonstrations of the methods of the Viet Cong including some fairly gruesome traps and a chance to fire a variety of the different guns (ranging from an AK-47 to the M60 machine gun) in their firing range!

Cu Chi tunnels

Here's a lady making the traditional rice paper for spring rolls etc...

Here’s a lady making the traditional rice paper for spring rolls etc…

It was interesting to see the war from a different perspective – with the Viet Cong as the protagonists – after studying the Americans involvement in school. The man showing us around the site had actually fought with the Viet Cong himself and had bullet wounds in his arms and leg to boot!

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2 thoughts on “Goodnight Saigon

  1. As usual,you capture the atmosphere so well.Those tunnels are unbelievably small!
    I like the eggshell art,too.

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