Underdog

I’m now teaching the grade fours: ages ranging from 11 to 13. Although interestingly quite a few of the children don’t actually know how old they are; their parents didn’t keep track! With my three classes today I set them assignments in their English lesson to write poems about their favourite animals or their responsibilities at home (depending on which class they were in). Quite a few made little, if any, sense but overall I was pleasantly surprised with what they managed to come up with. Here’s my favourite:

Only A Dog

Oh Mum and Dad…

Every night I guard

you while you are

fast asleep.

Every day we go hunting

for wild meat.

Yet you forget me.

Yesterday Verena introduced me to a German volunteer a year older than me called Phillip who’s working in publishing here for a year. We’re planning a bush hike for the weekend – not sure whether leaving tonight or tomorrow morning – but I will not be able to post until we’re back. That is if we make it back: The more I learn about this country the more I see how completely sated with crime it is! (I’ve been learning some fascinating details about the sorcery and witchcraft beliefs here – will write a post on that subject soon.) Phillip’s a black belt in karate though so that could come in handy in a sticky situation!

Advertisements

Mango Tree

Thomas and Verena’s house is fantastic – I feel really secure here. Thomas is the kind of man who commands respect whenever he enters a room. He’s very tall, broad, with dark hair and an impressive scar on his upper lip. Verena in contrast is a very warm and friendly woman: blonde hair blue eyes, like Thalia, and a tendency to laugh at pretty much everything. Thalia seems a bit of an anomaly with a strong American accent amongst the German – very impressive how they dip in and out of three languages! Recently Thomas brought back 120 Mangos from a visit to the coast so we have had a complete glut: Mango smooties, milkshakes, dried mango etc it’s pretty much the staple food here at the moment. Not that I’m complaining – I love it! Mangos aside, we’ve been eating traditional German meals every evening which is all very new to me. It’s completely bizarre that my introduction to German culture is taking place in the middle of PNG.

 However, Wendy (the lady who set up the arrangement for me to volunteer here) has been receiving messages from Mando telling her that I’m still sleeping in the village. I’ve been noticing some fairly strange behaviour developing: They are very concerned about keeping the support of the rotary club of Australia. I am to them merely an object that must either be looked after well or, failing that, Wendy must believe that I am being looked after well! A little bit of an awkward situation. Wendy and Verena have both suggested that I should teach at a different school for the remainder of the time but, as none of the teachers at Mando seem to have the slightest interest in the children there I would like to persevere, even if it does mean waiting around for PMVs for 3 hours to get home (like today). For example, today I seemed to be the only teacher in the school. I took three separate classes simultaneously all day. Not easy.