Cool, Calm and Collected

Yoga in Swedist Sunset

“The pursuit, even of the best things, ought to be calm and tranquil.”
 – Marcus Tullius Cicero

I met the Gambill’s at Copenhagen airport and together we hopped on a train to their hometown of Älmhult in the Småland province of Southern Sweden. (Had to get Vendela to write down all the names for me as couldn’t quite get the hang of the letters!) It’s so incredibly special, being completely cut off from stress and technology and surrounded by lakes and forest. There’s very limited internet access and no need for phones. The sun didn’t set until around 9 or later in the evening creating the magical feeling of midsummer. Again one of the first things I noticed was the smell: a really strong omnipresent smell of pines which I must have grown accustomed to pretty quickly as didn’t notice it after the first evening.

Mockeln Smaland

Daisy Chains

Vendela and Paulina making daisy chains in the garden of their Grandpa’s house

Delicious local kanelbullar (cinnamon rolls)

Delicious local kanelbullar (cinnamon rolls)

 

We spent lots of time on the shores of the enourmous Möckeln lake which was perfect for swimming in the scorching sun. It was fantastic to just get back to simple outdoor activities like playing the traditional Swedish game of ‘kubb’ where you essentially knock down pillars in opposing teams with elaborate ‘sticks’. The food was also delicious and simple: we had lots of knäckebröd (crispbread), cheese and tomatoes! Essentially our time was spent relaxing and going for walks along the lake and in the forest – very tranquil!

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Friendly ducks at Bökhult beach

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Playing kubb in the garden of the Gambill’s summer house in the forest

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We found a little board walk into the lake by the summer house which made an ideal spot for some evening yoga. We noticed the potential for photos though with the silhouettes against the sunset and ended up getting completely carried away! Overall, such a relaxing spot to get away from reality for a few days!

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Sugar Town

Nyhavn Copenhagen

“Everything you look at can become a fairy tale and you can get a story from everything you touch.”
― Hans Christian Andersen

It’s always intimidating to arrive at a hostel in the late evening: the large groups of ‘well-oiled’ young adults from all corners of the globe make you feel like you’ve wandered into some exclusive bar by yourself in the middle of the night.

First impressions of Copenhagen: The air coming off the plane from London seemed ridiculously fresh and clean. It appeared pretty small and manageable, with very picturesque canals and cobbled streets scattered with hundreds of bicycles.

Nyhavn Copenhagen

Nyhavn Copenhagen

Nyhavn Copenhagen

I was a little wobbly with the road system at first: I was wondering why the road was so wide before realising that half of it was a ‘bike road’ which sort of disguises itself as a very wide pavement, a misunderstanding which led to a few close shaves. On the first morning I wandered out to Nyhavn, a famous ‘heritage harbour’ canal waterfront packed with brightly coloured 17th/18th Century town houses which now act as cafés and restaurants. From here I meandered to the little mermaid statue, inspired of course by Hans Christian Anderson’s tale of the mermaid who gives up her aquatic life to gain the love of a prince and a human soul (dying tragically in the original tale, unlike the disney-tainted version which most people are now more familiar with). I’d been advised to not expect much, or even to avoid the site altogether due to the absurd number of tourists who flock to see it. As expected, it was absolutely crammed with people of all origins literally clambering all over it. However, having studied Hans Christian Anderson’s tale this year at university I couldn’t help but love it. In fact I think it depends a lot on the timing. I headed back for the evening light later in the day to see a fraction of the crowds that were there before.

The Little Mermaid Copenhagen

The Little Mermaid Copenhagen

The gardens, fountains and churches dotted about the city are beautifully maintained, seeming almost regimented and square. There are also these bizarre lines of bright orange identical buildings dotted about the place which I assume are for housing.

Rosenburg Castle

Rosenburg Castle

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I was incredibly lucky with the weather – absolutely spotless blue skies. I actually made the mistake of sunbathing in the park on the second day and managed to burn my entire body. I tried out one of the ‘soft ice’ ice creams which apparently is a local favourite, although found it far too sweet and creamy – no way near as good as the similar ones from ‘The Eskimo Hut’ in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

soft ice copenhagen

The food and, well, everything really, is incredibly expensive. Far more so than London, Paris or Tokyo even. Just as an indicator a small bottled juice cost the equivalent of around £5. I splurged on some expensive pastries though which, although undoubtedly fantastic, were again a little too sweet for my tastes.

Bakery Copenhagen

To compensate for the expense of the food (which I lowered by bringing food from home in my luggage) I stuck to free city activities, such as checking out the ‘Statens Museum for Kunst’ (national art gallery) and the national museum which had a fascinating exhibition on ancient Nordic history. The art gallery had a great selection of Matisse and Picasso, and some interesting local Danish art but didn’t take overly long to get through, say in comparison to the national gallery here in London.

Matisse self portrait

Matisse self portrait

Sculpture of Hans Christian Anderson's haunting 'Story of the Mother'. Here death is taking away the young child.

Sculpture of Hans Christian Anderson’s haunting ‘Story of the Mother’. Here death is taking away the young child.

Botanical gardens

Botanical gardens

Strøget - the centre of the shopping district.

Strøget – the centre of the shopping district.

The only site I expended a few Kroner for was the ’round tower’, with a bizarre curving brick walk way leading up to a beautiful view over the city.

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Have You Fed The Fish?

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“Flowers… are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty outvalues all the utilities of the world.”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

Last day in Tokyo :( I headed out in the early morning to the Tsukiji fish market, following a recommendation from my lonely planet guide book. It was incredibly easy to find, all I needed to do was follow the locals with their large empty baskets, bikes and lorries! It is absolutely gargantuan, undoubtedly the largest fish market I’ve ever seen (and by quite a considerable amount). There were the most bizarre sea creatures for sale in the dingy light including sea cucumbers, urchins and many things that I couldn’t recognise. Men were carving up enormous tuna steaks with what looked like swords and live fish and shell fish scuttled about in every direction. Many stalls had sashimi for sale at quite a price: could only be fresher if the fish was actually eaten whilst alive. Not really my cup of tea!

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Striking buckets full of huge tuna heads, can’t quite get the full scale here.

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After stopping at a bakery, to munch on a rather more appealing steamed chocolate bun made into a bear face, we headed out to Shinjuku in an attempt to find a novelty goods store (mainly thinking of Karl Pilkington’s ‘crisp picker’). We tried out ‘Tokyu Hands’ which, similar to ‘the Loft’ which I tried out in Shibuya, is like a department store which starts to hint at the crazy novelties that we were after. Llama mascara, anyone?

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Looking for bedside table decorations? Jellyfish in a jar should hit the spot. This one's upside down and looking incredibly sorry for itself.

Looking for bedside table decorations? Jellyfish in a jar should hit the spot. This one’s upside down and looking incredibly sorry for itself.

Mount Fuji fancy dress...

Mount Fuji fancy dress…

Final stop of the trip was the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden. It didn’t disappoint. Stacked full of the later blooming kind of blossom, it was simply breathtaking. The highlight has to be the traditional Japanese style part of the garden, with a couple of tea houses:

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Trimming the shaped trees

Trimming the shaped trees

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Man staring in disbelief at a cat...quite amusing.

Man staring in disbelief at a cat…quite amusing.

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After a fantastic last day I’m now sat wasting time in Beijing airport…home soon!

 

Last supper (actually breakfast) in Tokyo Haneda airport - finally found some edamame beans.

Last supper (actually breakfast) in Tokyo Haneda airport – finally found some edamame beans.

Bring it on Down

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“I’m on a diet, so I had only five extra helpings.”

– Gagamaru, Sumo Champion 2010.

It seems bizarre to invent a sport that requires its competitors to become clinically obese to stand a chance against their opponents. One of the professionals in this stable was a whopping 192kg.  It was, however, fascinating to watch. Our guide was a lady called Noriko, who takes tourists to watch Sumos in their early morning practices in Ryogoku. There are fairly strict rules that you have to follow in order to watch the practice including complete silence and not moving off the cushion on the floor for the full three hours: Fair bit of pins and needles engendered, as you can imagine. It was incredible how elaborate and ritualistic the practices are, starting with training of the lowest ranking members of the ‘stable’ then working up to the professionals, in white Mawashi (pants).

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Cleaning up the sand ring in between sessions

Cleaning up the sand ring in between sessions

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Surprisingly flexible!

Surprisingly flexible!

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Being back in the Ryogoku area, where we stayed the first time we were in Tokyo, we couldn’t resist visiting our favourite bakery down the road. Was just as fresh and delicious as I remembered. Here’s a bean cake and raisin bun.IMG_7128

With only a couple of days left we then decided to whiz off to Asakusa, one of the top tourist areas of the city with the ‘sky tree’ tower attraction and Sensoki temple. It was however absolutely rammed full of people and not nearly as spectacular as the Kyoto temples, in my opinion.

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Here you can see the sky tower and some bizarre piece of architecture which sort of resembles a gold-plated dog turd...

Here you can see the sky tower and some bizarre piece of architecture which sort of resembles a gold-plated dog turd…

 To cap off our busy day we headed to the Roppongi district of the city, where we had a long awaited reservation at Sukiyabashi Jiro. If you haven’t heard of Jiro before, he is an 88 year old sushi master, who’s spent his life perfecting the art of sushi, now running a three Michelin star restaurant underground in Ginza. Unfortunately, after many failed attempts, it became apparent that booking reservations for Jiro Ono’s own restaurant is next to impossible unless you’re local. (Much Thanks to Sheena for all her help with the attempted booking!). We instead made a reservation for his son, Takashi’s two Michelin star branch of the restaurant in Roppongi. Here’s a link to an advert for the film made about Jiro’s life’s work: ‘Jiro Dreams of Sushi‘.

We arrived a little early for our reservation time and were the only people in the restaurant. Takashi then proceeded to cut, shape, paint with soy sauce and present to us 19 courses of individual pieces of sushi. These ranged from ‘needle fish’ to sea urchin. My favourites were the medium fatty tuna and, much to my surprise, the giant clam which I was fully expecting to hate. It was bizarre how things which I would normally not even dream about eating were made perfectly palatable, such as roe and sea eel. With only two (and eventually another two) people joining us in the restaurant it felt like a private interview with Takashi who prepared the course, watched us eat it then prepared the next pieces. The sushi is served at the perfect temperature for each individual fish and you’re not supposed to add any soy or ginger. I made the heinous mistake of trying to add a little ginger to the octopus, being pretty squeamish about eating it, and Takashi actually said no and picked off the ginger himself. Overall, yes, It was incredibly good, and it did make me try things that I would otherwise never have tasted but in all honesty I really don’t think it’s worth the absolutely ridiculous price tag. On this occasion I was extraordinarily lucky enough to be treated to the meal, though, so obviously can’t complain! Would definitely NOT recommend this for a budget trip I’m afraid. Certainly a fascinating experience though. Only at the very end did Takashi break his rather stony, serious exterior and come out for a photo with us and to shake our hands.

A rather inconspicuous exterior in the middle of the otherwise highly ostentatious Roppongi hills shopping mall.

A rather inconspicuous exterior in the middle of the otherwise highly ostentatious Roppongi hills shopping mall.

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Sea Urchin

Sea Urchin

Whole shrimp

Whole shrimp

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Salmon Roe

Salmon Roe

Medium fatty tuna

Medium fatty tuna

Man in Black

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We’ve finally arrived back in Tokyo where the fleeting peak of the blossom season has past. Huge flurries of snow-like petals sweep through the parks and streets. It’s transience merely heightens the appeal of the beautiful phenomenon; we were fortunate to hit it head-on on our arrival. There are, however, a few varieties of the sakura which are still resiliently holding onto their adornment which I came across whilst walking through the gardens above the imperial palace, exploring the area vaguely surrounding were we’re staying. (Much to my frustration I only had the poor quality camera with me out on this walk; it was simply stunning.)

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I walked for around three hours, enjoying en route some of the fantastic strawberries they sell in the grocery shops here. I don’t know where they get them from or what they grow them in but they’re some of the best strawberries I’ve ever had: really sweet and delicious.

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With only a very poor quality map in my pocket guide book, after three hours of exploration I tried to get back and eventually ended up very lost, particularly as none of the locals seemed to know what street they were on either (streets are very poorly labelled here, if at all). I asked a young lady for directions (when the street I was convinced was the one to the hotel turned out to be somewhere completely different) and she was, yet again, another example of the outstanding Japanese hospitality. She didn’t speak a word of english but through the little japanese I’ve managed to get to grips with she understood and helped me to find a police station to work out where we were. She then jumped in a taxi which she told me to get in to and took me to the hotel, paying herself despite my objection, and chatting en route about her friend in England. Amazing! If only people were that friendly in the rest of the world!

This morning we headed to meet a lady called Vanessa to do a few hours of ninja martial arts training. It just so happened that the well known Japanese ‘Fuji TV’ television channel wanted to do a report on this dojo (training house) so asked if they could document our private lesson. It was incredible, right from the moment when we walked through the door to a meditation session in the dojo. It was just the two of us with Vanessa, the translator, the master ninja, a trainee and the two members of the TV crew. Firstly we joined in with a meditation session and ‘cutting the air nine times’ ceremony before getting into the clan’s traditional outfits and being taught how to correctly use a wide variety of elaborate weapons. Firstly we threw stars and these sharp sticks (much like chop sticks but ever so slightly more dangerous being spiked and made of metal). Then we had a go with the blow darts, aiming to swing through a revolving door, pop a balloon at the other side of the room then retreat through the door before being hit by the plastic ninja stars the others would fling at us. Luckily I managed to have a bit of a knack for the dart gun and got it first time, saving myself the embarrassment caused by my inferior muscle power in later ‘earth’ tiger claw trials.

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Here we were learning about ‘instinct’. We had to kneel facing away from the enemy and guess when they were swinging the weapon down to our heads, and raise up a guard. To be honest, I was going more by the swishing noise of the sword substitute. Wouldn’t have had that advantage with a samuri sword!

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Song To A Seagull

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“The human tongue is like wasabi: it’s very powerful, and should be used sparingly.”

― John Green, Paper Towns

It is absolutely freezing here in Matsushima: Really arctic winds making you constantly wish that someone would invent some sort of nose warmer. We headed out to wander about the area, noticing the complete lack of tourists and, therefore, English. Menus yet again became some sort of guessing game. Last night I had the weirdest array of different types of seafood including some sort of fringed grey thing and a yellow mollusc, I presume, which looked (and tasted) disturbingly like an ear.

We took a trip around the bay in a boat, the highlight of which was the hilarious translation on the hand out we were given:

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It says “It becomes troubled of other customers, and never never put out the customer of a pet taking from the cage, please while embarking.” … Right. That’s clear then. No taking the pet from the cage.

Another amusing moment was over lunch where we eventually managed to order some tuna rolls (following much pointing and miming) then literally were brought to tears by the amount of wasabi jammed into the little pieces. Hot doesn’t seem quite the right word. It feels more like some sort of acid explosion right the way up through your head to your nose and eyes. I have actually acclimatised a little to the Japanese way of sushi: I couldn’t stand wasabi or ginger before, now I’m partial to a little wasabi and there’s never enough ginger. This was far too much however. I left feeling as if my sinuses had just had some sort of toxic probing.

Here's the inconspicuous culprit. Little did we know that little atomic bombs were hidden in each little gem.

Here’s the inconspicuous culprit. Little did we know that atomic bombs were hidden in each little gem.

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We later took the bright red bridges out onto a couple of the islands were elaborate caves and Buddhist shrines have been carved into the sandstone. We also popped into the Masamune museum, Masamune is widely recognised as Japan’s greatest swordsmith, reaching legendary status. I’d never actually heard of him before.

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Finally, the seagulls are worth a mention. There are the most ridiculously large number of them packed into such a small area. And they’re all incredibly vocal.

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Ocean Breathes Salty

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This morning we embarked on yet another extensive train journey in the fantastic, clear weather, giving great final views of Fuji-San. The train network here, in combination with the absolutely incredible tool that is Google maps, is fairly easy to understand so the journey was faultless, again. Such a clear and organised country!

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Six hours later we arrived in Matsushima, 2 hours north of Tokyo on the Shikansen bullet train. It’s famous for being one of the ‘Three Views’ of Japan, and it’s clear why. To me, it’s like a Japanese version of Halong Bay. The area is scattered with 260 tiny islands (shima, in Japanese) covered in pine trees (matsu). It’s incredibly beautiful, particularly in the cool, crisp sunset. I may have to get up for the sunrise though as that would be over the ocean rather than the set which was behind the hills.

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Long Way Down

Lake Kawaguchi Mount Fuji
“Aspire to be like Mt. Fuji, with such a broad and solid foundation that the strongest earthquake cannot move you, and so tall that the greatest enterprises of common men seem insignificant from your lofty perspective. With your mind as high as Mt Fuji you can see all things clearly. And you can see all the forces that shape events; not just the things happening near to you.”
– Miyamoto Musashi (Japanese Martial Arts master, one of the world’s greatest swordsmen, 1584-1645)

I had my last dip in the Osaka Onsen yesterday morning before we headed out on a long and complicated train journey, with 6 stages, to Lake Kawaguchi in the shadow of the majestic, snow-capped Mount-fuji.

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Tried my second bento box en route – a bit of a mixed bucket as some compartments have delicious little rice dishes or Japanese sweets or omlette. Others had some less appealing surprises, for example a whole tiny little octopus…

Fuji-san, Japan’s national emblem, suddenly appeared as if out of nowhere out of the train windows, much larger than I’d anticipated. We’re staying in a traditional inn or ‘Ryokan’ next to Lake Kawaguchi. It is a fairly rural tourist-based town which, to my frustration, hasn’t been hit by the wave of blossom yet.

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Onsenji Ryokan

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Breakfast was served in our room by a lovely traditionally dressed Japanese woman. It was a spread of various, fish, rice miso soup, lots of bizarre things that I just couldn't place, these 'fish cake' omlette things and of course copious amounts of green tea.

Breakfast was served in our room by a lovely traditionally dressed Japanese woman. It was a spread of various fish, rice, miso soup, lots of bizarre things that I just couldn’t place, these ‘fish cake’ omlette things and of course copious amounts of green tea.

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We were very fortunate to arrive to a fantastically clear sky for the sunset. Today we haven’t had such luck. We decided to head out to Fuji-Q Highland, famous for it’s spectacular views of the mountain. Fuji-Q is home to some fairly jaw-dropping roller coasters: Fujiyama, once the tallest in the world – still in the top 10 tallest and longest roller coasters; Dodonpa – once the world’s fastest, now the 4th fastest but still will the highest acceleration at launch time – from 0-172Km/h in 1.8 seconds after starting (just incredible!); Eejanaika 4D with 14 inversions; and Takabisha, officially the steepest roller coaster in the world with a 121 degrees vertical freefall. I fairly fairly dizzy after all that, to say the least, but it was just mind-blowing!

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White Walls

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“I’d rather live in a cave with a view of a palace than live in a palace with a view of a cave.”
 – Karl Pilkington

Osaka castle was the first stop this morning after revisiting a favourite Japanese bakery. It’s incredible just how many people have come over to see the country in this season, and you can see why – it’s extraordinary. Around the castle there where huge groups of tours from various Asian countries, including a football team from Myanmar who I spoke to about Yangon for a while. Wedding’s are going on everywhere and all the women are getting our their best clothes for the season.

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After yet another tube/JR train journey we arrived back in Kyoto and headed to the North West to explore the temples in the hillside forest side of the city before heading back across to Nijo castle in the west. We must have walked miles today my feet are absolutely killing me! Definitely worth it though. Apologies for being lazy but I’m going to let the pictures speak for themselves again.

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N.B. – Very exciting spotting the Geisha’s wandering around the Gion district of the city. Didn’t manage to get a shot though as wasn’t sure whether it was appropriate. Also enjoying the avian spotting opportunities – saw a peregrine falcon (Hayabusa, as they’re known in Japan) today!

 

(Nothing But) Flowers

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“The earth laughs in flowers.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

This morning we headed back out through the Osaka subway system and the Japanese Rail bullet train to Kyoto where we wandered about the temples and parks of the South Eastern part of the city. Due to the Sakuri (blossom) the festival of Hanami (flower viewing) was in full swing in the city, with women getting out their traditional kimonos and fairs popping up in all the parks.

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We headed to a little traditional tea parlour called ‘En’ were we watched a 45 minute tea ceremony. I couldn’t help thinking about Karl Pilkington banging on about how someone can make such a big deal out of a cup of tea. This kept me chuckeling whilst the lady careful folded and refolded her napkin numerous times to ceremoniously wipe and present each utensil before carefully preparing the matcha green tea with, frothing it up with a bamboo whisk. The matcha green tea is ground up young tea leaves which have been carefully grown to reduce the amount of sunlight they get to keep the taste sweet. It has a surprisingly large amount of caffeine in it as it’s not just the leaf being infused in the water, you’re actually drinking the leave itself.

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Kneeled on the floor, we then drank and enjoyed little Japanese sweets, of which they are completely obsessed here, with sweet shops every 5 metres. Then, with the sun starting to set we headed out to Maruyama park.

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It’s been bitingly cold so I’m actually really looking forward to getting back to the company of 30 odd naked women at the Onsen.

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